Out with the Old ..

KDE4 ports will be removed from FreeBSD ports on December 31st, 2018

The KDE-FreeBSD team met at Akademy this year, and while hacking on some other stuff, we also got around to deciding what to do with the KDE4 ports. We have wanted to get rid of them for some time, and there is an increasing pressure of maintainence on them: code written in 2003 doesn’t play well with the C++ of 2018 (in particular clang keeps getting more picky, which is good).

As for KDE4 itself: there haven’t been any upstream KDE4 releases since Applications 17.08.3, and Qt4 upon which it depends is EOL since 2015. The latest KDE Plasma desktop has been available in the official ports tree for over four months (and has been in use by users of Area51 for much much longer).

So, given that there is a viable upgrade path (although, truth be told, you’ll probably have to re-configure KMail and get used to Falkon), we’ve decided to put a four month deprecation period on all the KDE4 ports. They will be removed at the end of this year, which will free up some maintainence time for chasing the steady stream of updates from the KDE community.

Akademy, Akadeyou

Akademy is the yearly conference of the KDE community, and of KDE e.V. What makes the conference isn’t so much the technical content — see Kevin’s sketchnotes for instance — but the people. Seeing KDE Brasil grow the way it has is great (hey, people, please post a date for LaKademy). Aracele gives a good overview. Even bigger is KDE India, what a bunch of happy and talented contributors. Shout-out to Abhijeet for being one of the far-flung travelers.

I could only stay until wednesday morning, so I didn’t talk with anywhere near all the people I would have liked to sit down with. I did sit with Tobias, so that half of the KDE-FreeBSD team was hacking together, and with Leinir, and there was beer with Paul, .. with a conference of 200 people, the list of darn-didn’t-talk-to is always going to be longer than the list of good-seeing-you-again people. Such is life.

In the sense that Akademy is about me, and you, and making connections within the community, I’ll share one more anekdote: I stayed in a dorm room at the recommended hostel, and the first morning, still in my shorts, had a brief conversation in German with some guy about the ventilation mechanism in the bathroom. Then I pulled on my KDE India shirt, and the conversation turned a corner: hey, are you going to that KDE contributors thing? Turns out that roommate was also going, to his first Akademy.

Turns out, mr. Schiffner was “just a user” who “just runs the 20 Linux desktops” in a company. Wow! I’m really happy we got some “just users” at the conference, because where it’s important for the developer community to “put a face to names” to improve communication the rest of the year, it is also important for users to know that there’s regular people behind the software, as well. Personally I’d be really happy to have some user-talks; talks about deployments or specific use-cases of applications; a KDEnlive talk from a movie-maker would be keen. (That said, Paul did give a talk somewhat like that, about KDEnlive and promo films).

So, take-away things from Akademy are:

  • Debugging KConfig is full of surprises, even now, and having KDE-FreeBSD CI is really useful.
  • The Netherlands is just a local transportation network, for Itinerary.
  • Distro’s generally all feel the same pain.
  • Nobody wants to think about LDAP.
  • People are more important than things.

Coming back from the conference is always a bit weird; there is tons of neat stuff from the event still whirling around in my brain, and there’s 900 unread email messages in my inbox that need attention. I’ve sorted through most of it, done some communications things, pushed a bunch of commits to Calamares, and am now gearing up for an event next week in Brussels. But in september, things will be calm again.

(PS: gosh, I missed Carlos Soriano at the event, who has written a really cool I-went-to-Akademy from another kind of outsider’s perspective — we’re all in this Free Software thing together.)

More Laptops

One of the things to come out of Akademy is the first community release of the KDE neon Pinebook Remix image. I’ve been carrying around the Pinebook for some time — since FOSDEM, really, where I first met some of the Pine folks. At Akademy, TL was back and we (that’s a kind of royal “we”, because TL and Rohan and Bhushan and other people did all the hard work) got around to putting the finishing touches on the Pinebook image.

There’s not much to show beyond what you can see on the Dot already (my own Pinebook is looking a bit beat-up after a year, and the drawing Timothée did on it is rubbing off), really, so I’m not going to add photos: the Pinebook is a low-cost, low-power, quite adequate laptop, and it runs a modern KDE Plasma.

Best Service

How often do you meet your laptop vendor in person? Last year, I picked up a KDE Slimbook, and the machine has been great, acting as my development-box-on-the-go for lots of KDE travels. It has a few stickers, and some scratches, and the screen had gotten a bit wobbly by now .. so, at this year’s Akademy I stopped by the Slimbook stand, admired the newer Slimbook II (alas, the old one isn’t written off yet), and mentioned the wobbly screen.

Photo of an envelope from SlimbookHow often does your laptop vendor say “we can fix that” and do it right there and then? So I had a nicely tightened, fast and friendly Slimbook by the end of the next talk. Not only that, but when I got home from Akademy, I found an envelope with some stickers and the right tool to fix it myself if it happens again.

Now that’s developer-friendly service! Thanks, Alejandro and Raúl, and hope to see you again next year.

One does not simply walk into Møn

It was summer, and the sun was shining, and I had posted that Calamares was going to sleep for the summer, so then I went with my family to bicycle in Denmark.

Screenshot of map

Route to (light green) and from (dark green) Møn. Map image from OSM.

We took the train to Flensburg, and headed east. Lots of ferries on the way, and at the wonderful Edible Campground on Ærø we found three messages-in-a-bottle. Denmark has mørk pålægchokolade, which is great for breakfast and lunch but needs to be purchased daily because it melts and sticks together (and four people can eat a lot of chocolate). In the 28-degrees-and-sunny weather we drank ¾ litre of water per person per hour of bicycling — getting enough water meant planning stops a little more carefully.

Photo of tents and bicyclesOn the way back we went through Germany, where “moin” is the standard greeting and the Aldi has white wheaties (breakfast of bicyclists). We camped in the Hüttener Berge, which was beautiful and quiet — previously I only knew about that area as “the last rest stop on the Autobahn before Denmark” which is neither beautiful, nor quiet.

And now after 710km on the bike I’m back in the Netherlands, preparing for Akademy and gently poking Calamares to see if it will wake up from slumber.

Going to Deventer^WVienna^WAkademy

Today I’m heading out to Deventer to say “hi” to Valorie and Boud, whom I’m be seeing again next week in Vienna, at Akademy.

Akademy is, for me, first and foremost a way to see everyone again and re-calibrate my social settings for everyone. After all, I communicate with most KDE people only electronically, though text, and it’s sometimes really important to see the faces behind the IRC nicknames. So I’m particularly excited that Michael Pyne will be there, who has been a voice in KDE for as long as I care to remember, but whom I’ve never actually met. And there will be lots of GSoC students there, new people who deserve all the support they can get — and commendations for the work they have done in KDE this year.

Personally I’m not planning anything specific at Akademy. I may chair a panel during the conference parts, and the Distro BoF is something I’ll definitely attend with my FreeBSD hat on. Other than that, it’ll mostly be spur-of-the-moment what I’m doing. Tug on my sleeve if you want coffee and a chat, about portability, installers, OEM stuff, codes of conduct, or Rick Astley.