Multiboot Pinebook KDE neon

Recently a KDE neon image for the Pinebook was announced. There is a new image, with a handful of fixes, which the KDE Plasma team has been working on over the past week and a half.

Photo of Pinebook

Pinebook running KDE neon

Here’s a picture of my Pinebook running KDE neon — watching Panic! At the Disco’s High Hopes — sitting in front of my monitor that’s hooked up to one of my openSUSE systems. There are still some errata, and watching video sucks up battery, but for hacking on documentation from my hammock in the garden, or doing IRC meetings it’s a really nice machine.

But one of the neat things about running KDE neon off of an SD card on the Pinebook is that it’s portable — that SD card can move around. So let’s talk about multiboot in the sense of “booting the same OS storage medium in different hardware units” rather than “booting different OS from a medium in a single hardware unit”. On these little ARM boards, u-boot does all the heavy lifting early in the boot process. So to re-use the KDE neon Pinebook image on another ARM board, the u-boot blocks need to be replaced.

I have the u-boot from a Pine64 image (I forget what) lying around, 1015 blocks of 1024 bytes, which I can dd over the u-boot blocks on the SD card, dd bs=1k conv=notrunc,sync if=uboot.img of=/dev/da0 seek=8, and then the same SD card, with the filesystem and data from the Pinebook, will boot on the Pine64 board. Of course, to move the SD card back again, I need to restore the Pinebook u-boot blocks.

Photo of a dusty circuit board

KDE neon Pinebook edition running on a Pine64, with console output

Here’s a picture of my Pineboard (the base is a piece of the garden fence, it’s Douglas pine, with 4mm threaded rods acting as the corner posts for my Pine64 mini-rack), with power and network and a serial console attached, along with the serial console output of the same.

The nice thing here is that the same software stack runs on the Pine64 but then has a wired network — which in turn means that if I switch on the other boards in that mini-rack, I’ve got a distcc-capable cluster for fast development, and vast NFS storage (served from ZFS on my FreeBSD machines) for source. I can develop in a high(er) powered environment, and then swap the card around into the Pinebook for testing-on-the-go.

So to sum up: you can multiboot the KDE neon Pinebook image on other Pine64 hardware (i.e. the Pine64 board). To do so, you need to swap around u-boot blocks. The blocks can be picked out of an image built for each board, and then a particular image (e.g. the latest KDE neon Pinebook) can be run on either board.

Akademy, Akadeyou

Akademy is the yearly conference of the KDE community, and of KDE e.V. What makes the conference isn’t so much the technical content — see Kevin’s sketchnotes for instance — but the people. Seeing KDE Brasil grow the way it has is great (hey, people, please post a date for LaKademy). Aracele gives a good overview. Even bigger is KDE India, what a bunch of happy and talented contributors. Shout-out to Abhijeet for being one of the far-flung travelers.

I could only stay until wednesday morning, so I didn’t talk with anywhere near all the people I would have liked to sit down with. I did sit with Tobias, so that half of the KDE-FreeBSD team was hacking together, and with Leinir, and there was beer with Paul, .. with a conference of 200 people, the list of darn-didn’t-talk-to is always going to be longer than the list of good-seeing-you-again people. Such is life.

In the sense that Akademy is about me, and you, and making connections within the community, I’ll share one more anekdote: I stayed in a dorm room at the recommended hostel, and the first morning, still in my shorts, had a brief conversation in German with some guy about the ventilation mechanism in the bathroom. Then I pulled on my KDE India shirt, and the conversation turned a corner: hey, are you going to that KDE contributors thing? Turns out that roommate was also going, to his first Akademy.

Turns out, mr. Schiffner was “just a user” who “just runs the 20 Linux desktops” in a company. Wow! I’m really happy we got some “just users” at the conference, because where it’s important for the developer community to “put a face to names” to improve communication the rest of the year, it is also important for users to know that there’s regular people behind the software, as well. Personally I’d be really happy to have some user-talks; talks about deployments or specific use-cases of applications; a KDEnlive talk from a movie-maker would be keen. (That said, Paul did give a talk somewhat like that, about KDEnlive and promo films).

So, take-away things from Akademy are:

  • Debugging KConfig is full of surprises, even now, and having KDE-FreeBSD CI is really useful.
  • The Netherlands is just a local transportation network, for Itinerary.
  • Distro’s generally all feel the same pain.
  • Nobody wants to think about LDAP.
  • People are more important than things.

Coming back from the conference is always a bit weird; there is tons of neat stuff from the event still whirling around in my brain, and there’s 900 unread email messages in my inbox that need attention. I’ve sorted through most of it, done some communications things, pushed a bunch of commits to Calamares, and am now gearing up for an event next week in Brussels. But in september, things will be calm again.

(PS: gosh, I missed Carlos Soriano at the event, who has written a really cool I-went-to-Akademy from another kind of outsider’s perspective — we’re all in this Free Software thing together.)

More Laptops

One of the things to come out of Akademy is the first community release of the KDE neon Pinebook Remix image. I’ve been carrying around the Pinebook for some time — since FOSDEM, really, where I first met some of the Pine folks. At Akademy, TL was back and we (that’s a kind of royal “we”, because TL and Rohan and Bhushan and other people did all the hard work) got around to putting the finishing touches on the Pinebook image.

There’s not much to show beyond what you can see on the Dot already (my own Pinebook is looking a bit beat-up after a year, and the drawing Timothée did on it is rubbing off), really, so I’m not going to add photos: the Pinebook is a low-cost, low-power, quite adequate laptop, and it runs a modern KDE Plasma.

Best Service

How often do you meet your laptop vendor in person? Last year, I picked up a KDE Slimbook, and the machine has been great, acting as my development-box-on-the-go for lots of KDE travels. It has a few stickers, and some scratches, and the screen had gotten a bit wobbly by now .. so, at this year’s Akademy I stopped by the Slimbook stand, admired the newer Slimbook II (alas, the old one isn’t written off yet), and mentioned the wobbly screen.

Photo of an envelope from SlimbookHow often does your laptop vendor say “we can fix that” and do it right there and then? So I had a nicely tightened, fast and friendly Slimbook by the end of the next talk. Not only that, but when I got home from Akademy, I found an envelope with some stickers and the right tool to fix it myself if it happens again.

Now that’s developer-friendly service! Thanks, Alejandro and Raúl, and hope to see you again next year.

One does not simply walk into Møn

It was summer, and the sun was shining, and I had posted that Calamares was going to sleep for the summer, so then I went with my family to bicycle in Denmark.

Screenshot of map

Route to (light green) and from (dark green) Møn. Map image from OSM.

We took the train to Flensburg, and headed east. Lots of ferries on the way, and at the wonderful Edible Campground on Ærø we found three messages-in-a-bottle. Denmark has mørk pålægchokolade, which is great for breakfast and lunch but needs to be purchased daily because it melts and sticks together (and four people can eat a lot of chocolate). In the 28-degrees-and-sunny weather we drank ¾ litre of water per person per hour of bicycling — getting enough water meant planning stops a little more carefully.

Photo of tents and bicyclesOn the way back we went through Germany, where “moin” is the standard greeting and the Aldi has white wheaties (breakfast of bicyclists). We camped in the Hüttener Berge, which was beautiful and quiet — previously I only knew about that area as “the last rest stop on the Autobahn before Denmark” which is neither beautiful, nor quiet.

And now after 710km on the bike I’m back in the Netherlands, preparing for Akademy and gently poking Calamares to see if it will wake up from slumber.

Going to Deventer^WVienna^WAkademy

Today I’m heading out to Deventer to say “hi” to Valorie and Boud, whom I’m be seeing again next week in Vienna, at Akademy.

Akademy is, for me, first and foremost a way to see everyone again and re-calibrate my social settings for everyone. After all, I communicate with most KDE people only electronically, though text, and it’s sometimes really important to see the faces behind the IRC nicknames. So I’m particularly excited that Michael Pyne will be there, who has been a voice in KDE for as long as I care to remember, but whom I’ve never actually met. And there will be lots of GSoC students there, new people who deserve all the support they can get — and commendations for the work they have done in KDE this year.

Personally I’m not planning anything specific at Akademy. I may chair a panel during the conference parts, and the Distro BoF is something I’ll definitely attend with my FreeBSD hat on. Other than that, it’ll mostly be spur-of-the-moment what I’m doing. Tug on my sleeve if you want coffee and a chat, about portability, installers, OEM stuff, codes of conduct, or Rick Astley.

Those top Konsole Contributors

Whenever I see a post about community growth or participation — like Tomasz Canabrava’s most recent “From Nothing to top 20 contributors of Konsole in Less Than a Month” — I reach for the toolkit written by Kevin Ottens, because that makes it easy to obtain good numbers and graphs for community measurement.

Graph of Konsole's Entire History, all scrunched up and made tinyLooking at the graph (click to enlarge, but it’s still hardly readable — I’d suggest using Kevin’s tooling directly if you want to zoom in or experiment) of Konsole development since the very beginning shows a few striking facts:

  • Konsole has been in continuous development since 1998
  • Except for a gap 2006-2009, Kurt Hindenburg has been active in Konsole since roughly 2004
  • By looking at the density of commits and the length of commit-streaks, you can guess at maintainers and co-maintainers of Konsole, alongside all the occasional committers. There’s maybe five people whose histories suggest that.

Of personal interest to me is that in 2002 I contributed to Konsole for FreeBSD compatibility, and in 2009 for OpenSolaris compatibility, but nothing else in the history of the project. And Konsole spent a year licensed as Artistic, rather than the GPL2-or-later, in 1999.

Graph of Konsole's Recent HistoryRecently, you can definitely see that Tomaz has been really active, and Kurt has slightly more quiet time. But Ahmad and Mariusz are also consistently putting in work, albeit with a lower rate of commits. Judging by the commit messages, those have gone through Phabricator. That means that their commit counts are reduced because arc squashes commits (just like Tomaz, and as pointed out by Eike elsewhere). Keep in mind that commit-counts are poor proxies for contributions — that’s something we’ve been saying for years and years.

Also of interest in the history: there are 1090 commits by people not in the top-twenty; if those were grouped together they would hold second place!

So, thanks Tomaz for being noisy about what you’re doing. I think we need more of the “hey, I can improve the world” kind of noise — like KDE’s GSoC stories as well. And also, thanks Kurt and KDE community for being consistent and productive in small amounts for many years.

CMake 3.12 Update on FreeBSD

CMake 3.12 has reached rc1. That means we’re testing the update on FreeBSD, and building lots and lots of packages. And, as I’ve written previously, every CMake update triggers a bunch of interesting software findings.

As a motto, I’ve got “use it, aggressively improve it” on my website (you can hire me for odd CMake and C++ jobs, too). So hitting compile issues makes me turn to fixing software outside of KDE.

  • Spring is a 3D RTS engine, with only a minor CMakeLists fix — CMake 3.12 is strict about file(GLOB) and the FOLLOW_SYMLINKS keyword, which is documented only for file(GLOB_RECURSE). Since CMake 3.5, probably much earlier, that keyword has been ignored, and now it’s an error (this is considered a regression).
  • Coin3D is a 3D toolkit, which in the version currently available on FreeBSD, doesn’t even use CMake. It hit a bunch of Clang6 compatibility issues, and after some investigation it turns out they had all been fixed already in later releases; I put in a little time to improve FreeBSD compatibility for the next release.

What I found interesting in those two was once again the variety in CMake styles — “Modern CMake Style” still needs to catch on in many places, and the wider ecosystem. Mantis bug-tracker! Mercurial! I remember being a big Mercurial fan years ago when doing KDE-Solaris and complaining how obtuse git is. (It’s still obtuse, but I’m used to it now).

There’s another four dozen ports that have fallout from this update; amusingly Kitware’s VTK 5 and VTK 6 are among them — although a first glance tells me that’s C++ problems and not CMake problems, actually. (Generally, using NULL in places where you want to write 0; older macro definitions of NULL would re-write to something that could successfully be cast to 0, but clang6 in C++17 mode, the default, uses nullptr which doesn’t cast).

Cracking the HDD

I’ve learned that IBM Travelstar 40GB drives use glass platters. I learned this the fun way, by bending one in a vice, with a big set of pliers. It went snap, tinkle — a different sound from other drives. And after that the bendy drive was usable as a maraca!

So why was I bending drives in the first place?

Well, I volunteer some of my time at a local second-hand place called Stichting Overal. It is an “idealistic” organisation that uses the revenue from second-hand sales to support various projects (generally small-scale development, like funding the construction of sanitation in schools). Like most second-hand stores, there’s clothes and ancient kitchen appliances and books and used bicycles .. and also an IT corner.

I help out Tom, a local school kid who has run the IT corner for some time. From time to time a PC or monitors or random IT crap is dropped off for re-use, and we apply triage. Yes, that is a lovely 486DX2, but it is still going into the bin. For various reasons, there’s a mismatch between supply and demand of hard drives: we end up with piles of small ATA-33 drives, and very few 80GB-or-more SATA drives.

Machines that show up and not immediately consigned to the bin are thoroughly cleaned (’cause, eww). Some machines are cannibalized for parts for others. Working, usable hard drives are wiped, and then re-triaged. Since we don’t want to leak whatever data is on the drives (even after wiping, and customers aren’t always all that careful about what they bring in either), leftover drives are destroyed.

So that’s why I was contorting a laptop drive. Here’s a Christmas ornament I have made out of a desktop 3.5″ drive.

Machines that get through this gauntlet are dd’ed with zeroes, then installed with some flavor of GNU/Linux. Even if there’s a valid Windows license attached to the machine, getting that installed correctly and legally is way more effort for us than doing something we know is right (and Free). Lately it’s been Fedora 27 with rpmfusion, and a KDE Plasma 5 desktop (I didn’t do the choosing, so this was a pleasant surprise). Frankly, I’m not convinced we’re doing a really good job in delivering the Linux desktop PC experience to the buyers, since there’s no Linux / Fedora documentation included (now I write that down, I realise we should probably check if there’s licensing obligations we need to follow up on). What it kinda needs is an OEM installer to do some post-sale configuration like setting up a user (I can think of at least one).

The World and Calamares

This last week, my desk mostly looked like this:

Photo of desk with atlas and monitors

WQHD and even more HD on paper.

There was a bug report for Calamares that Reykjavik was misplaced. And once I started looking at that, it was pointed out that Johannesburg was misplaced as well, and then I did some serious clicking around and found that most of the southern hemisphere was subtly off in Calamares.

Why?

The timezone-selection widget in Calamares was borrowed from some distro installer a long time ago, and at some point the images were resized, and some math corrected to map image points to latitude and longitude on the map. The resizing introduced some aliasing artifacts, and then the math moved locations far north — where a typical map projection is “stretched out” to the wrong spot. Some time ago I fixed up things above 65 degrees north or so. Reykjavik is at 64-and-a-bit north, so wasn’t handled then. And it was a bodge anyway.

Screenshot of timezone selection widget

Your Reykjavik is in another timezone

So this week I sat down with an atlas (because that provides a much nicer overview than any online map, and has latitude and longitude lines) and a list of places to test. The selection works better now, much better far south, but it’s not right yet. Basically, I’m going to have to re-draw this stuff, so I’m learning a little qgis to try to get this done (and otherwise I’ll ask a friend in Nijmegen who does GIS stuff professionally).

The atlas nearest to my desktop was Velhagen & Klasings Kleiner Handatlas, printed in Leipzig, Germany, in 1922. I didn’t feel like walking downstairs and grabbing a newer atlas. I figured the continents haven’t moved that much in the past 96 years.

What I hadn’t counted on was how much the world has changed. When I realised that, I kept the atlas open as an education.

It’s not really visible in the photograph above, but in 1922 Africa was almost entirely under the yoke of colonialism. What wasn’t “owned” by Europe, was blank. Germany had recently lost its colonies. Long-range air travel didn’t exist (although the Atlantic had been crossed by a non-stop flight by then). The number of telegraph cables across the Pacific ocean could be counted with a two-bit integer.

Photo of pages from atlas

Colonies and Steamship Routes

Remember that: the world wasn’t always as it is today, and needn’t be the way it is today, tomorrow. Strive to make it better.

Clicking around, I selected Harare, the capital of Zimbabwe. It’s been Harare since my earliest memories (insofar as I thought about cities in Africa as a child). Knowing the latitude and longitude I could look it up in my atlas (to check that its visual place on the map matches where it should be). Unfortunately, there’s only Salisbury in South Rhodesia there. Lagos, now 20 million people, is a small dot at six degrees north. All the struggles for independence are yet-to-come on this map. Almost everywhere I looked, a world that is very different.

So the thing I set out to fix in Calamares has been fixed, but the atlas is still on my desk, as a reminder to me of things that have changed, and things that haven’t.