Welcome x11/kde5 to the FreeBSD Ports Tree

Desktop wallpaper with Konqui and FreeBSD LogoThere is no KDE5. There are KDE Frameworks 5 (releasing monthly, now reaching version 5.45) and KDE Plasma Desktop 5 (releasing quarterly, I think, now 5.12) and KDE Applications (releasing semi-anually, called 18.04).

For the FreeBSD ports tree, there is a x11/kde5. It is a metaport, which means it collects other ports together; in this case, x11/kf5-frameworks (metaport for all the frameworks), x11/plasma5-plasma-desktop and a fistful of KDE Applications metaports (e.g. the metaport for KDE games, and the metaport for KDE graphics applications, and the metaport for what-we-consider-essential KDE applications like konsole, konqueror, dolphin, and okular). So, from a bare FreeBSD installation, installing x11/xorg, x11/sddm, and x11/kde5 should get you close to a working modern KDE Desktop experience. Throw in www/falkon and devel/kdevelop for a developer workstation, or graphics/krita for an artists workstation, and you’ve got a daily driver.

I’m not really happy with naming the port this way, but it is just an identifier that needs to distinguish it from other bits and pieces on the system. And our naming was historically such a mess that it’s taken a long time to sort out; there are still some odd corners like x11/kde-baseapps.

KDE4-style exit buttonWhat this means is that KDE4 users and modern KDE Desktop users can now be separated out effectively with the KDE packages on FreeBSD. Since there’s no more upstream releases of KDE4-era code and Qt4 was end-of-lifed long ago, I can see us going the same route as Ubuntu (and Debian, and basically everyone else) soon-ish (in FreeBSD time) and handing the whole unmaintained stack to people with an active interest in maintaining it themselves, or dropping it.

Photo of FOSDEM booth with Tobias

The elusive Tobias at FOSDEM

Special and exceptional thanks needs to go to Tobias Berner for pushing the last bits to the official ports tree and for catherding this process over the course of several years (of course, you could run a modern KDE Desktop from Area51 since 2016 or so, but not from the official ports tree).

So, what’s next? Well, in no particular order:

  • Qt 5.10 in the official tree. We’ve pushed it quickly to the KDE-FreeBSD CI systems so that git master can continue to build, but it needs to go to the official ports tree too. Main issue is dealing with WebEngine (no surprise there), so we’re looking at Qt 5.10 and the unmodified WebEngine from 5.9 — a FrankenEngine, which, for all its frightening and unnatural connotations, is probably the right name for it anyway.
  • Improving overall system integration and dealing with papercuts.
  • Chasing our CMake and KDE bug lists.
  • Bringing Wayland to fruition on FreeBSD. This in cooperation with the Mesa and GNOME teams.
  • Fixing ports and things all over the tree as we bump into things (I’ve spent some time with FreeRDP recently, and should say thanks to Kyle Evans for taking my throw-them-at-the-wall patches and making them stick).

That’ll keep us busy through 2018.

KDE at FOSS-North

Over the weekend, while some KDE people were in Toulouse improving Akonadi, and other KDE people were in Berlin improving Plasma, I was in Goteborg at FOSS-North showing off some KDE things.

Anyone who saw our FOSDEM booth knows the setup. We still had the same blue table (thanks, Sune) and selection of low-power ARM blinkenlights, the Pine64 and a Pinebook. I still think that “hey, Plasma runs fine on an overpowered x86 laptop” is not particularly interesting, but that “the past six months have seen serious work on reducing Plasma’s resource usage aimed specifically at this kind of device” is. Different from FOSDEM is that I could now run one of the just-released Netrunner images for the Pinebook.

There are pictures circulating of a staged fist-fight between me and Bastian, who ran the GNOME booth. Except for those 30 seconds, we were good neighbours and I’d like to thank Bastian for keeping an eye on things when the KDE booth wasn’t otherwise occupied.

Bigger thanks to Helio, who came from not-Bavaria to help at the stand as well and give a software archaeology talk. And biggest thanks to Johan, for setting up and running the whole conference.

I gave a talk on governance — call it “Open Source Project Governance 101, with a brief mention of how KDE does it specifically”. A half hour is long enough for an overview, not long enough to really go over all the considerations you might have along each of the different axes of decision. I’m more than happy to be talking with people about specific issues in governance. I didn’t see many talks themselves: just one on deep-dive C++ and OpenGL stuff (I didn’t understand all of what Patricia does) and reproducible-builds tools like diffoscope (Chris’s talk gave a nice overview).

CMake 3.11 in FreeBSD

The latest release of CMake has landed in FreeBSD. Prior to release we had good contact with KitWare via the bug tracker so there were few surprises left in the actual release. There were still a few last-minute fixes left, in KDE applications no less. Here is a brief summary of changes we made:

  • FindQt doesn’t match the way FreeBSD ports are built and installed, so we defer to QMake rather than looking for directories,
  • FindOpenMP gets a tweak because it won’t find the system pthreads library when gcc (for Fortran) is used,
  • FindBLAS gets a larger tweak because BLAS may need to link to libgcc_s, and which gcc_s that is needs to be figured out via ldd(1).

Some older patches have gone away because upstream has picked them up. Tweaks downstream, in package-building-terms, of cmake that were necessary:

  • check_include_files respects the required libraries, which can be a surprise when the required libraries have been found but not fully plugged into the build (e.g. missing -L flags).
  • the order of includes in automoc sources has changed, which reveals places where a C++ header file doesn’t actually include all of the headers it needs to fully define the types it uses; previously the include order might implicitly include them and the issue is papered over.

CPack now fully supports producing FreeBSD packages from a build / install tree by default, so for non-ports software which uses CMake, cpack -G FREEBSD does the right thing. Previously, this was a non-default tweak to CPack as built in FreeBSD ports.
Edit: as of CMake 3.11.0_1, CPack no longer supports producing FreeBSD packages. There were some unexplored corners of the build process that cause build failures when the FreeBSD pkg(8) support is enabled. So it’s off again until we shine some more light into those corners.

.. and a PS., CMake 3.11.1 has just been released, which reverts the change to check_include_files which I’d been working around.

Modern Akonadi and KMail on FreeBSD

For, quite literally a year or more, KMail and Akonadi on FreeBSD have been only marginally useful, at best. KDE4 era KMail was pretty darn good, but everything after that has had a number of FreeBSD users tearing out their hair. Sure, you can go to Trojitá, which has its own special problems and is generally “meh”, or bail out entirely to webmail, but .. KMail is a really great mail client when it works. Which, on Linux desktops, is nearly always, and on FreeBSD, iswas nearly never.

I looked at it with Dan and Volker last summer, briefly, and we got not much further than “hmm”. There’s a message about “The world is going to end!” which hardly makes sense, it means that a message has been truncated or corrupted while traversing a UNIX domain socket.

Now Alexandre Martins — praise be! — has wandered in with a likely solution. KDE Bug 381850 contains a suggestion, which deserves to be publicised (and tested):

sysctl net.local.stream.recvspace=65536
sysctl net.local.stream.sendspace=65536

The default FreeBSD UNIX local socket buffer space is 8kiB. Bumping the size up to 64kiB — which matches the size that Linux has by default — suddenly makes KMail and Akonadi shine again. No other changes, no recompiling, just .. bump the sysctls (perhaps also in /etc/sysctl.conf) and KMail from Area51 hums along all day without ending the world.

Since changing this value may have other effects, and Akonadi shouldn’t be dependent on a specific buffer size anyway, I’m looking into the Akonadi code (encouraged by Dan) to either automatically size the socket buffers, or to figure out where in the underlying code the assumption about buffer size lives. So for now, sysctl can make KMail users on FreeBSD happy, and later we hope to have things fully automatic (and if that doesn’t pan out, well, pkg-message exists).

PS. Modern KDE PIM applications — Akonadi, KMail — which live in the deskutils/ category of the official FreeBSD ports were added to the official tree April 10th, so you can get your fix now from the official tree.

Modern KDE Applications on FreeBSD

After the shoving is done — and it is, for the most part — it is time to fill up the void left behind by the KDE4 ports that have been shoved aside. In other words, all over the place <foo> has been shoved aside to <foo>-kde4, and now it’s time to reintroduce <foo>, but in the modern KDE Applications form. For instance, there is now a science/kalzium-kde4 (the old stuff) and a science/kalzium (the new stuff). It’s not 100% complete, but most of the applications are there.

Tobias has been the driving force behind this, with ports commits like r466877 which introduced the modern KDE applications in science/. So a huge shout-out to his work in bringing things almost-up-to-date.

Note that we now have KDE Frameworks (5.44 .. there’s an exp-run planned for this week’s 5.45 release) and KDE Applications (17.12.3) but not a Plasma 5 Desktop; so you will be running KDE Applications on the older desktop of your choice if you’re using FreeBSD ports.

The Shoving Continues

More KDE4 parts have been moved around on FreeBSD. Basically what we’re seeing is that all the existing KDE4 ports — that is, pretty much all KDE software except the KDE Frameworks 5, which are the kf5-* ports already available — are getting a -kde4 suffix. I resurrected the old filelight from KDE4 times, which we had updated to the modern KDE Applications version some time ago. That is so that KDE4 users can get the authentic (in the case of filelight-kde4, I think that also means “buggy”) experience. Users of x11/kde4 are encouraged to update and upgrade regularly these days, to catch all of the moves of packages. There are no actual updates in here, no new packages, since there aren’t any more upstream releases.

Now that we’re looking closely at the tree we find that there are some stragglers — I moved skanlite, too, for instance, which we missed in earlier shoving-rounds. Expect skanlite (un-suffixed) to be resurrected in the coming weeks, then, as the KDE Frameworks 5 based version. You can, of course, run that in a KDE4 session — or in any other desktop you like. After all, KDE software runs all over the place, it is not (generally) tied to the Plasma desktop.

So look for KDE4 to be pushed entirely to one side soon-ish, and then for something new to flow in and take its place.

CMake 3.11 (P)reparations

CMake 3.11 is here — it went through four rc’s — which means that preparatory work is underway in KDE FreeBSD land (and has been since -rc1). KDE, as the main early consumer of CMake, is the package maintainer on FreeBSD. That means that it falls to us to signal things that break due to CMake updates, and often to fix them as well. Generally the KDE ports (even the KDE4-era onces) are not a problem; modern-ish CMake was basically develop-tested in KDE. Sometimes updates in C++ bite us — recent FreeBSD releases keep updating Clang, which keeps getting more picky about C++ code (and may default to newer C++ standards than expected). But generally, KDE stuff is ok.

To test a CMake update, I build about 2000 packages on my own desktop workstation. It takes about 20 hours with all the supporting libraries and other bits — rebuilding Qt Webengine, three WebKits, five llvm’s and gcc6 kinda takes its time. Then there’s maybe two dozen packages that don’t build, and it comes down to figuring out whether they don’t build because of a change in CMake, or a change in something else, or simply because they’re already broken. But it means I end up diving into all kinds of codebases, for instance:

  • dspdfviewer had a simple C++ error, because of newer Clang being picky. (already fixed)
  • SuperTux2 has a weird #define type .. which of course breaks some C++ standard libraries where type is used as a structure field name. (already fixed)
  • sqlitebrowser has a really weird copy of QtScintilla which has both an enum and a list of #defines for the same tokens .. which breaks under some inclusion sequences. (not fixed)
  • hatari assumes that SDL_INCLUDE_DIR can only have one directory. (already fixed)
  • kicad has a typical CMake 2.6 or 2.8 setup, where some newer CMake modules from 3.0 have been copied into a cmake/ directory. This eventually breaks when the internals that the 3.0 modules rely on change. Fixing this is as easy as just deleting the old, crufty CMake bits that are shipped with the software — but it needs to be spotted before an update anyway. (already fixed)

There are not software packages I would normally involve myself with, and of these five, three have problems that are not really CMake-related.

KitWare has been great in responding to reported regressions, by the way. So those 2000 packages also serve as a testbed to spot unexpected changes in CMake’s behavior. Sometimes the best thing to do is to fix it in CMake, sometimes update the other software — or sometimes say “this has been unmaintained upstream for six years, let it go.”

There are two issues left on my list which are vexing: drawpile needs an extra include with CMake 3.11 and Wesnoth can’t find OpenMP anymore. There’s another dozen or so packages that are failing and need some work. I need to get those sorted out one way or another before the CMake 3.11.0 update hits the FreeBSD ports tree. For the over-eager, it’s already in the area51 staging tree, in branch cmake-3.11.

Outta the way, KDE4

A comic panel from Mary Worth showing the Central Park Shover

The Central Park shover gives a bad example.

KDE4 has been rudely moved aside on FreeBSD. It still installs (use x11/kde4) and should update without a problem, but this is another step towards adding modern KDE (Plasma 5 and Applications) to the official FreeBSD Ports tree.

This has taken a long time mostly for administrative reasons, getting all the bits lined up so that people sticking with KDE4 (which, right now, would be everyone using KDE from official ports and packages on FreeBSD) don’t end up with a broken desktop. We don’t want that. But now that everything Qt4 and kdelibs4-based has been moved aside by suffixing it with -kde4, we have the unsuffixed names free to indicate the latest-and-greatest from upstream.

KDE4 users will see a lot of packages moving around and being renamed, but no functional changes. Curiously, the KDE4 desktop depends on Qt5 and KDE Frameworks 5 — and it has for quite some time already, because the Oxygen icons are shared with KDE Frameworks, but primarily because FileLight was updated to the modern KDE Applications version some time ago (the KDE4 version had some serious bugs, although I can not remember what they were). Now that the names are cleaned up, we could consider giving KDE4 users the buggy version back.

From here on, we’ve got the following things lined up:

  • Qt 5.10 is being worked on, except for WebEngine (it would slow down an update way too much), because Plasma is going to want Qt 5.10 soon.
  • CMake 3.11 is in the -rc stage, so that is being lined up.
  • The kde5-import branch in KDE-FreeBSD’s copy of the FreeBSD ports tree (e.g. Area51) is being prepped and polished for a few big SVN commits that will add all the new bits.

So we’ve been saying Real Soon Now ™ for years, but things are Realer Sooner Nower ™ now.

(The image is from Mary Worth, november 19th 2013, via Mary Worth and Me; this character is known as the Central Park Shover, and he, um .. shoves people out of the way. The Shover does not manage to steal her purse.)

Event Notes

From a KDE event somewhere in 2017 I found this note in the KDE-booth-crate that I keep at home:

1. thin, sour, 4/10 2. slap in the face, gummi bears, fotlcs 5/10 3. citrussy note 6/10 4. aardberg, smokey x3 8/10 5. nothing happens, competent

I can reconstruct that this particular event had some whiskey, but except for the Ardberg I would have no idea what any of them were. There are no alcoholic notes from FOSDEM, except that we ordered a beer because it was described as “trés désalterante” and we decided after tasting that that was French for “pretty gross”. It certainly quenched our thirst for more.

But if you’re thirsting for more KDE events, there’s the list of KDE Sprints which is where you will find the small, focused, fairly short events for hacking on a well-defined project. Some are open for visitors, and if there’s something you want to hack on with a group of KDE contributors, get organising! (Like, seriously, getting a hacking weekend together is just a few phone calls to reserve a rental house somewhere nice and to arrange for transportation — if you can get the people together, which is usually the biggest problem).

And of course there’s Akademy 2018 in Vienna — I suppose tasting notes will be of terrible coffee and that horrible Mozart liqueur — which is the two-litre stein of KDE interaction each year. The call for presentations is open, so you can pour your wisdom, wit, or vinegar on the audience this summer.

Plasma 5.12 on FreeBSD

“Of course it runs FreeBSD, too” is something I said a lot in the past week (regarding the Pine64, mostly, but also about my Slimbook). I also said “Of course it runs on FreeBSD, too” a lot. Naturally area51, the unofficial KDE-FreeBSD ports tree, contains the latest in released KDE software. Plasma 5.12 and KDE Frameworks 5.42, with Qt 5.9.4. We just bumped Qt to pick up a patch from KDE’s Eike Hein to fix some weird hover behavior. So we’re all up-to-date on the KDE front, and I’ve been running it as my main desktop since the build finished in poudriere.

On the official ports front, Qt 5.9.4 and KDE Frameworks 5.42 are what we’ve got. There’s a big move coming up of KDE4 ports, which is to make room (in a sense) for KDE Applications and the Plasma Desktop ports. If you’re using KDE4 from ports, then expect package bumps and renames over the weekend (no functional change, just a lot of ports will get a -kde4 name to distinguish them from the currently-maintained, up-to-date un-suffixed ports which will land afterwards.